Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Policies Manual





VIRTUAL SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA CENTER
MANAGEMENT MANUAL
by Marjorie L. Pappas/links edited by Suzan Durnell
Marjorie L. Pappas, Ph. D., is an Associate Professor at the School Library and Information Technology Online Learning, Mansfield University of Pennsylvania. E-mail: mpappas@mansfield.edu
Suzan Durnell is a Library Media Specialist at El Dorado Springs Elementary in El Dorado Springs, Missouri.
Email:  sdurnell@mail.eldo.k12.mo.us
School library media specialists often post messages on LM_NET and other state listservs I monitor, requesting examples of information that I used to maintain in a management manual when I was a school library media specialist. I started my manual when I was a student in the organization and administration course we all take in library science programs and I kept it current with information gleaned from conferences, workshops, and networking with other school library media specialists. Manuals are easier to maintain today because of networking through listservs and the Internet. In thinking about the requests for information related to policies, job descriptions, cataloging, resource acquisition, etc., I decided a virtual version of this traditional paper manual might be an interesting and useful concept.
SETTING UP MY VIRTUAL MANUAL
My concept of virtual is paperless. Virtual manuals can be maintained without the challenge of adding pages and adjusting page numbers. Virtual manuals can include hyperlinks to information located on the Web. Before starting the development of my manual, I thought about who might access the manual besides the school library media specialist. Library assistants, volunteers, and, occasionally, substitutes should all be able to access this manual. Also, the library media specialist should be able to access the manual when working at home. The best way to achieve that flexibility is to post the manual on the library media center's website or on the school's network, assuming the network is Internet accessible. If a library media center website or network is not available, the concept is still feasible, but a little more challenging, because new versions would need to be loaded on separate computers. Once this decision has been made, the next step is to scan and/or key-in the existing information related to the specific library media center. Following are sections and weblinks to include.
POLICIES
Some policies need to be written to fit the unique needs of a specific library media center, for example, circulation policies that establish the time periods books circulate and the cost for replacing lost books. Other policies, like copyright, are based on federal legislation. Links to Web-based copyright information will be useful to supplement local policies.
POLICY WEBLINKS:
PERSONNEL
The school library media specialist's job description should be posted, but it also would be useful to link to job descriptions for student and parent volunteers. The Web provides examples of job descriptions for this section.
EXAMPLES OF JOB DESCRIPTIONS:
COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT AND ACQUISITIONS
The purchase of resources and technology for the library requires access to information about producers and jobbers.
USEFUL WEBSITES:

FORMS
Examples can help school library media specialists develop the forms for use in the library media center. This is a section that can be developed over time.
EXAMPLES OF FORMS:
GUIDELINES
FOR BLOGGING BY STUDENTS AND STAFF:
FOR DEALING WITH STUDENT PLAGIARISM:
DISTRICT PORTAL AS MANUALS
School library media services in larger school districts have developed excellent portal pages. These portals provide school library media specialists with both instructional and management resources and tools.
EXAMPLES OF PORTALS:
These virtual manuals and portals enable parents, community members, and other school library professionals to view how school library media specialists manage media centers and teach students to gather and use information. Now all we need is a portal page to the portals.


1 comment:

  1. I had not thought about having the students indicate that they had edited someone's else's work. I ought to contact Marjorie and tell her how I'm using her work. It's been a while since I've talked to her.

    The Copyright for Kids is new to me. It is absolutely amazing how many different sources there are for copyright information.
    I note the library circulation guidelines that your chose from Albuquerque has overdue fines. Did you consider looking at a policy that didn't have fines at all?

    The Pleasant Hill job description is fine -- but I did note that the job specifically states there are no supervisory responsibilities which makes me wonder if there will never be a library aide for the library or if there is a lilbrary aide the librarian will have no oversight of the position.

    I like Doug Johnson's questions for a potential hire better than the ones from the public library -- but some of them are pretty specific and I would like to have thought about ahead of time.

    The link to Waterville Valley Elementary School is wrong.

    The Templates and Resources for the School Librarian has some nice stuff. Unfortunately, it hasn't been updated for some time and some of the links no longer work (Sunlink no longer exists, for example.)

    Great examples of the plagiarism and blogging guidelines. Lots of good stuff out there.

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